Feb

27

In This Issue  
     
  Last Week in Review:The markets were closed Monday but the rest of the week had its share of good and bad news.

Forecast for the Week:A plethora of economic reports will hit the wires, with news on inflation, manufacturing, the state of the economy and more.

 

View: Thank you may be two small words, but they carry a large significance.

 

 
     
  Last Week in Review  
     
  Every cloud has a silver lining. That popular idiom is one way to look at the headlines last week, both here in the U.S. and overseas. Read on for the details and what they may mean for home loan rates. There was good news on Friday as Consumer Sentiment rose to 75.3, which is the best level since February of 2011. However, this news was tempered by the rise in oil prices that we have been seeing. Theres a good side and a bad side to higher oil prices.

On the one hand, high oil prices are very detrimental for the fragile U.S. economy, as consumers have to put more of their discretionary dollars into their gas tanks…meaning they have less to spend elsewhere. High oil prices are also inflationary as the added shipping and material costs apply upward price pressures on Producer or Wholesale goods that either have to be absorbed by the producer, thus hurting profits and the ability to expand or hire. Or the added costs get passed onto to the consumer…a la a rise in consumer inflation.

 

The silver lining is that high oil prices could actually be good news for home loan rates, as the dampening effect on economic growth produces a sluggish economic environment in which Bonds (including Mortgage Bonds, to which home loan rates are tied) thrive. This is an important topic to continue watching in the weeks and months ahead.

 

In silver linings overseas, after seemingly endless negotiations, Greece, investors and central bankers came to an agreement to provide Greece with 130Billion Euros ($172 Billion) in financial aid. This will help the country fund itself through March and into the future… as long as it institutes economic reform, austerity measures and meets deficit targets. Any deal with Greece will be very tough to implement and a default could still occur…which makes this another important topic to keep close watch on.

 

Between some of this uncertainty from overseas being lifted, a lower unemployment rate, and better than expected economic reports, home loan rates havestruggled to improve beyond some of the best levels seen over the past two weeks. But yet another silver lining is that home loan rates remain near historic lows, and now continues to be a great time to purchase or refinance a home. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

 

 
     
  Forecast for the Week  
     
  After last week’s holiday-shortened week, there will be plenty of economic reports to watch for.

  • Pending Home Saleswill be released on Monday and could have a relatively modest impact on trading.
  • Durable Orderswill be delivered on Tuesday. This report gives a look at consumer spending for products that are expected to last at least three years.
  • Another important report will be Consumer Confidenceon Tuesday, as the American consumer is a very important player in the U.S. economy.
  • In the manufacturing sector, the Chicago PMI and the ISM Index will be released on Wednesday and Thursday, respectively.
  • The all-important Gross Domestic Productreport comes on Wednesday and will give a detailed view on the overall picture of growth in the U.S.
  • Weekly Initial Jobless Claims will be released on Thursday, and last week’s claims remained near four-year lows, signaling that the jobs market could be healing.
  • Finally, the Core Personal Consumption Expenditure (PCE) report will be released on Thursday. This is the Fed’s favorite gauge of inflation.

 

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond that home loan rates are based on.

 

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving – and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

 

To go one step further – a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

 

As you can see in the chart below, roller coaster trading in the markets continues. I’ll continue to monitor this situation closely.

 

Chart: Fannie Mae 3.5% Mortgage Bond (Friday Feb 24, 2012)

 

Japanese Candlestick Chart

 

 
     
  The Mortgage Market Guide View…  
     
      7 Ways to Say Thanks

It’s hard to go through the day without hearing the words “thank you” or “thanks.” However, much of the time, people say those words quickly and without much meaning. Sure, a quick “thanks” is appropriate when someone holds a door for you or hands you something.

 

But when it comes to saying thank you to a client, partner, or friend for a more significant gesture, it’s important to go the extra mile. This is even more crucial in today’s business environment when success is so dependent on personal connections.

 

So how do demonstrate your appreciation? Here are 7 ways to say thank youto strengthen your relationshipsand to stand out in the mind of the person you’re thanking.

 

1. Classic and Classy. Mailing thank you notes has dwindled in today’s email business environment. That means you can really stand out and demonstrate your sincereappreciation by hand writing a brief thank you note and mailing it. Not sure what to write? No problem. Check out this simple advice for writing a thank you note.

 

2. A Little Surprise. Little surprises can be a fun way to thank a client, colleague, or friend. You may want to write a thank you note, but then slip it into a file that you hand the person. Or you could consider getting the person’s jacket for them when they get ready to leave a meetingand then slip the note into a pocket just before you hand it to him or her.

 

3. See You in the Papers. If you have a newsletter, social media page or blog, thank people publicly. A short “shout out” can go a long way.

 

4. Phone a Friend. There’s something about hearing a person’s voiceand it’s even better when they call just to say thank you rather than to ask for something.

 

5. Face-to-Face. Dropping by to say thank you goes a long way to demonstrating your sincerity and to strengthening your relationships.

 

6. Time Is On Your Side. People seem busier than ever. That’s why making time for someone means so much. One way to thank a person is simply to schedule some time for coffee or to chat. Then, turn off your cell phone and give him or her your undivided attention.

 

7. A Good Cause. Sometimes it’s not appropriate to give money or a gift. That’s ok. You may find that a unique and sincere gesture is to make a donation to a worthy cause that the person cares about. Then, let the person know about your donation as a way of saying thanks.

 

Economic Calendar for the Week of February 27 – March 02

 

Date
ET
Economic Report
For
Estimate
Actual
Prior
Impact
Mon. February 27
10:00
Pending Home Sales
Jan
1.0%
 
-3.5%
Moderate
Tue. February 28
08:30
Durable Goods Orders
Jan
-1.4%
 
3.0%
Moderate
Tue. February 28
10:00
Consumer Confidence
Feb
62.5
 
61.1
Moderate
Wed. February 29
08:30
Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
Q4
2.8%
 
2.8%
Moderate
Wed. February 29
08:30
GDP Chain Deflator
Q4
0.4%
 
0.4%
Moderate
Wed. February 29
09:45
Chicago PMI
Feb
60.0
 
60.2
HIGH
Wed. February 29
02:00
Beige Book
Feb
 
 
 
Moderate
Thu. March 01
08:30
Personal Spending
Jan
0.3%
 
0.0%
Moderate
Thu. March 01
08:30
Personal Income
Jan
0.4%
 
0.5%
Moderate
Thu. March 01
08:30
Personal Consumption Expenditures and Core PCE
Jan
0.2%
 
0.2%
HIGH
Thu. March 01
08:30
Personal Consumption Expenditures and Core PCE
YOY
NA
 
1.8%
HIGH
Thu. March 01
08:30
Jobless Claims (Initial)
2/25
355K
 
351K
Moderate
Thu. March 01
10:00
ISM Index
Feb
54.5
 
54.1
HIGH

 

   

 

 
 
The material contained in this newsletter has been prepared by an independent third-party provider. The content is provided for use by real estate, financial services and other professionals only and is not intended for consumer distribution. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, there is no guarantee it is without errors.
As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.
Mortgage Market Guide, LLC is the copyright owner or licensee of the content and/or information in this email, unless otherwise indicated.   Mortgage Market Guide, LLC does not grant to you a license to any content, features or materials in this email.   You may not distribute, download, or save a copy of any of the content or screens except as otherwise provided in our Terms and Conditions of Membership, for any purpose.

 

Certified Mortgage Planner, Curtis Schartz, Home loan, Interest Rate, Interest Rates, kansas city, lees summit, lower interest, lower rates, Mortgage, mortgage backed securities, no cost refinance, overland park, Pulaski Bank, purchase,

Feb

27

Mortgage News
What Do GDP and QE3 Have to Do With Home Loan Rates?
If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.That popular idiom could be applied to the Advance Gross Domestic Product (GDP) reading–or first of three readings–for the 4th Quarter of 2011, which came in at 2.8%, a bit below expectations of 3.2%. This number will be revised two more times, but if the final GDP remains at 2.8%…then the overall GDP for 2011 would be a scanty 1.57%.

GDP represents the market value of all goods and services produced within a country in a given period–and is an indicator of our standard of living–so that number would certainly be a “Gross” Domestic Product, especially when you consider that the government has underwritten more than half of that economic growth with the Payroll Tax benefit.

What’s more, besides being subsidized by the government’s Payroll Tax Holiday, the GDP reading was driven mainly by a build up in inventory (retailers buying from wholesalers) and NOT new sales to consumers. It is quite reasonable to see this trend reverse in the first part of 2012, which would make for a weaker GDP reading. And a weaker GDP reading will make a third round of Quantitative Easing (QE3) a virtual lock.

So, why is this significant and what does this have to do with home loan rates?

First, it’s important to understand that home loan rates are tied to Mortgage Bonds, and when Bonds improve, home loan rates typically move lower. History has shown that Bonds improve in anticipation of Quantitative Easing, but then selloff once the official announcement is made. Think about the old investing adage: “Buy on the rumor, and sell on the news.” So if rumors of QE3 continue to swirl, we should continue to see great home loan rates leading up to any actual announcement.

Even if the Fed doesn’t do QE3, rates will likely remain attractive as the continuing debt problems in Europe will make our Bonds a safe haven for investors. The bottom line is that now remains a great time to purchase or refinance a home. If you have any questions or need any help navigating today’s opportunities, call or email me anytime.

 
 
 
If you know anyone who is looking to buy, sell or refinance a home, please forward their name and telephone number to us. We will happily provide the same high level of service that we have provided to you. The greatest compliment you could possibly give us is the referral of your friends and family.
 

 

 
 
Finance News
Can a Credit Score Kill a Job Offer?
No, but your credit report might, so be upfront about problems.
By Lisa Gerstner, Kiplinger.com
Despite what you may have heard or read, employers do not have access to job candidates’ credit scores. That should come as a relief to cash-strapped job seekers with maxed-out credit cards or other score-busting blemishes.But your prospects for getting hired aren’t immune from a poor credit history. In most states, employers are able to check a potential or current employee’s credit report, which lists information such as balances on your loans and credit accounts, late payments, and debt collections.

About 13% of employers check credit reports for all candidates and 47% check for those applying to selected positions, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. Employers are usually most interested in the credit backgrounds of applicants who will handle finances, hold an executive-level position or have access to other employees’ confidential information (such as human-resources professionals). The black marks that might give an employer pause are ones that leave the deepest stains on your record: a loan default, a bankruptcy, a debt that’s gone to collection.

An employer must obtain your permission to pull your credit report. But declining is “like saying no to a Breathalyzer test,” says John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education for SmartCredit.com. “The consequences are sometimes worse than just getting it over with,” he says – namely, the employer could choose another applicant for the job if you are secretive.

Be honest and upfront about any problems. A potential boss may be sympathetic to the financial trauma that a layoff and long bout of unemployment have caused. And keep in mind that your credit record is only one piece of your profile. According to the SHRM, credit history ranked lowest among criteria employers used to vet candidates.

Reprinted with permission. All Contents ©2012 The Kiplinger Washington Editors. www.kiplinger.com.

 
 
 
 

 

Creative Cuisine
Quick and Easy Vegetable Soup (4-6 servings)
Soup is good food, especially when the temperatures are cool outside. Here’s a recipe for my Quick and Easy Vegetable Soup (4-6 servings):– 4 C chicken or vegetable stock
– 1 C water
– 1 14-15oz can chopped tomatoes in puree
– 1/2 onion, chopped
– 2 cloves garlic, chopped
– 1 large carrot, peeled and chopped
– 1 celery rib, chopped
– 1 cup fresh green beans, chopped into 1-inch long pieces
– 1 ear of corn, kernels removed
– 1 14-ounce can white cannellini beans, drained
– 1 Tsp Herbs d’ Provence, or Italian seasoning
– Extra-virgin olive oil
– Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a soup pot, heat 3 to 4 tablespoons of olive oil over a medium flame. Add onion, garlic, carrot and celery. Season with salt and pepper and allow the vegetables to cook until the onions just start to soften (3 to 4 minutes). To the vegetables, add the canned tomatoes, chicken stock, water and herbs. Season with salt and pepper, mix well and bring just to the boil. Add green beans, corn, and canned beans. Reduce to a very low simmer and allow the soup to cook for 12-15 minutes, or until the green beans soften, but remain slightly al dente.

No stranger to professional kitchens, Kirk Leins currently devotes most of his time to cooking instruction, food writing, and producing television. You can visit Kirk’s website at www.NoTimeToCook.com.

 

 

 
 
Street Smarts
Life Saving Knowledge
Every two minutes, sudden cardiac arrest strikes one American–and for every minute that passes without CPR or emergency treatment, the survival rate decreases by 10%.Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs) increase a victim’s chance of survival by 90%–if applied to a victim within the first minute of a heart attack. That’s why, more and more public places like airports, schools, and health clubs host this life-saving device.

Knowledge is power–and in this case–it’s knowledge that can save your life, or the life of someone you love! Here is some important information you should know about AEDs:

  • AEDs are well marked and located in visible, high traffic areas like elevators, exits, fire extinguishers, restrooms or telephones.
  • The American Red Cross and American Heart Association state that the AED should be placed such that a person could get the device and get back to a victim of sudden cardiac arrest within three minutes.
  • The American Red Cross offers Heartsaver® CPR-AED classroom courses and eLearning courses.
  • AEDs are a bit expensive; however they are an investment that can save a life. They can be purchased by visiting the Centers for Health and Public Safety website.
  • AED rules and legislation varies by state, however under The Good Samaritan Law, limited immunity is offered “for individuals who render emergency treatment with a defibrillator. Specific protection varies by state.”

To learn more about AEDs, visit the Centers for Health and Public Safety website.

 

 

 
 
Home News
4 Tips for a Cozy Décor
Love the cozy feeling holiday decorations bring to your home? Here are four great tips for creating that ambiance anytime of year:Family photos. Groupings of family photos should be first on your list. Find shelf space or side tables that could use a personal touch, and then add a few family photos. The frames don’t have to match, but they should coordinate…and they should have the same design as the mood you’re trying to create. If it’s coziness you seek, try adding rich wood frames and classic designs to your décor.

Heirlooms and antiques. You’d be surprised what an antique camera can add to a display of family photos. Or how an antique vase can set the tone for an entire room. These items are inexpensive to purchase at an antique store, but if you have a family heirloom with a story it’s even better.

Personal or seasonal touches. Remember, your family and your community are unique and should be celebrated. So, for example, if your family took a unique vacation to a sandy beach last year, you can fill a decorative jar with the sand and surround it with a photo or two. Or, you can simply bring natural elements–such as pinecones or autumn leaves–inside and place them in a large bowl or dish with photos or candles.

Warm the senses. Don’t forget to fill the air with a fresh fragrance that fits the mood you’re creating. Often, those fresh scents are the first things that visitors notice. So consider lighting scented candles, purchasing plug-in air fresheners with seasonal scents, or just baking homemade cookies before company arrives.

 

 

 
 
Facts and Figures
Fumble? Foul? No…Just the Facts!
   
In honor of Super Bowl XLVI we turned to the Census Bureau for some fun facts about the demographics of the host city (Indianapolis) and the cities (New York and Boston) represented in this year’s big game at Lucas Oil Stadium.

  • New York ranks first on the list of the nation’s most populous cities.
  • On average, it takes New York residents 38.7 minutes to get to work–and 55% of them take public transportation.
  • Median home value of owner-occupied homes in Boston is $369,600.
  • 44% of Boston residents 25 and older have a bachelor’s degree or higher, according to data from 2010.
  • According to data from 2010, the estimated population of Boston was 617,594.
  • The median household income for Indianapolis, Indiana is $38,502.
  • The median home value of owner-occupied homes in Indianapolis is $118,100.
   

Certified Mortgage Planner, Curtis Schartz, Home loan, Interest Rate, Interest Rates, kansas city, lees summit, lower interest, lower rates, Mortgage, mortgage backed securities, no cost refinance, overland park, Pulaski Bank, purchase,

Feb

6

 According to the Case-Shiller Home Price Index, prices in the 20-City Composite fell in 19 of the 20 cities from October to November. Only Phoenix saw an increase, with prices moving up .6% from October to November. Prices were also down 3.7% from November 2010 to November 2011. The Case-Shiller Price Indices are constructed to accurately track the price path of typical single-family homes located in each metropolitan area provided.  Additional information can be seen at my LinkedIn page: 

 

 

 

 

Feb

6

Last Week in Review:The Jobs Report for January is in – and the news was good!

Forecast for the Week:Stocks and Bonds will be battling over investing dollars as only two economic reports are scheduled.

 

View: President Obama has proposed a new plan to help homeowners refinance. Check out the details below.

 

 
     
  Last Week in Review  
     
  It’s been said that no news is good news. But last week, the Jobs Report brought some good news for the labor market. Read on for the details…and what they mean for home loan rates. The headline Jobs Report showed 243,000 jobs created, which was much better than expected. Meanwhile, a whopping 257,000 private jobs were created, also much higher than expected. Upward revisions to November and December added another 60,000 jobs to what was previously reported for those months. And adding to the euphoria was a 0.2% decline in the Unemployment Rate, bringing it to 8.3%…the lowest since February 2009.

 

 

Despite all this good news, the report did show a pretty sharp decline in the labor participation rate from 64% to 63.7%. We really need to have more people “participating,” or working to help pay down our debt. Understandably, the demographics of baby boomers retiring does account for some of the decline. But is it the entire 0.3%? And the U-6 Unemployment Rate (which counts all persons marginally attached to the labor force, including those who are employed part-time but would prefer full-time) remains at a lofty 15.1%, with that figure dropping just 0.1% for the month.

And there was other good news to note last week as well: The Commerce Department reported that Personal Incomes rose in December by 0.5%, above expectations and well above the 0.1% reported in November. This marked the largest increase in nine months!

So what does all of this mean for the housing market and home loan rates?

While Bonds and home loan rates did worsen on the good Jobs Report news (remember good economic news often causes money to flow out of Bonds and into Stocks, as investor try to take advantage of gains), home loan rates remain near historic best levels. In addition, the problems in Europe remainand as uncertainty reemerges, US Bonds (including Mortgage Bonds, to which home loan rates are tied) will benefit.

The takeaway from all of last week’s news is that the pace of improvement in the labor market is choppy and muddled at best. But the trend is improving over time, and this is welcome news for the struggling housing market because as people feel more secure in their jobs, they are more willing to consider making major purchases like a home.

The bottom line is that now is a great time to purchase or refinance. Let me know if I can answer any questions at all for you or your clients.

 

 
     
  Forecast for the Week  
     
  There are just two economic reports due for release this week and with earnings season winding down, the Stock and Bond markets will be battling over investing dollars.

  • Thursday brings the weekly Initial Jobless Claims Report. Last week people filing for first-time claims fell by 12,000 to 367,000, an encouraging sign now that claims have fallen below that dangerously high level of 400,000.
  • On Friday, we’ll see the first reading on Consumer Sentiment for February.

In addition, the Treasury will sell a total of $72 Billion in Notes and Bonds this week.

Remember: Weak economic news normally causes money to flow out of Stocks and into Bonds, helping Bonds and home loan rates improve, while strong economic news normally has the opposite result. The chart below shows Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS), which are the type of Bond that home loan rates are based on.

When you see these Bond prices moving higher, it means home loan rates are improving – and when they are moving lower, home loan rates are getting worse.

To go one step further – a red “candle” means that MBS worsened during the day, while a green “candle” means MBS improved during the day. Depending on how dramatic the changes were on any given day, this can cause rate changes throughout the day, as well as on the rate sheets we start with each morning.

As you can see in the chart below, Bonds and home loan rates worsened after the Jobs Report was delivered on Friday. I’ll be watching closely to see what happens this week.

Chart: Fannie Mae 3.5% Mortgage Bond (Friday Feb 03, 2012)
Japanese Candlestick Chart

 

 
     
  The Mortgage Market Guide View…  
     
      New Proposal to Help Homeowners Refinance…

But Will It Ever Get Off the Ground?

The Obama administration has proposed a national refinance plan in an effort to stimulate the housing market by helping those homeowners who are underwater on their mortgages, or owe more on their loan than what the home is currently worth. Based on the proposal, the program would be available to responsible mortgage borrowers…and could save them up to $3,000 a year if they were to partake in the program.

However – and this is very important – the plan is currently just a proposal and would have to be passed through both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

President Obama first introduced the plan at his State of the Union Address on January 24th and stated just recently that this is a “make-or-break” moment for the middle class. The President said the program will cut through the red tape with no hidden fees.

There are, however, certain stipulations within the President’s proposal. The candidates would have to be current on their mortgages for the past six months and could only have one missed payment in the six months prior to that. The candidate would have to have a credit score of at least 580. The loans would be backed into Federal Housing Authority (FHA) loans and would come from loans that are privately held, and would expand on the Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) that is currently open to loans that are backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In addition, the loans would have to be 30-year conforming loans or loans that fall between $271,050 to $729,250, and the residence must be owner occupied.

The White House would also want lenders to take a “haircut” for those homeowners who are deep underwater. Homeowners that are deep underwater could be more susceptible to foreclosure or to just “walk away” from their commitment to repay the debt.

Here’s an example of what the plan might mean to a homeowner, if the proposed plan were to be approved. On a $200,000 loan that is currently at 6%, the borrower would receive an interest rate of about 4.25%, which could amount to a savings of $216 a month on a 30-year mortgage. There would also be an option to move into a 20-year mortgage and – although the payments would not be lowered – it would provide an incentive to build equity and to pay off the loan in a shorter amount of time.

But before you get too excited or start making any plans, we have to remember that this is just a proposed idea at this time.

As with every new bill introduced to Congress, there could be pushback for the plan, which is expected to cost as much as $5 Billion to $10 Billion. The President said that the new plan would not add to the deficit; instead, the funds would come from a fee placed on large financial institutions. This has already gotten negative comments from Republicans in Congress. The White House said that other options to pay for the program would be considered.

This isn’t the first time that Capitol Hill has tried to combat the problems of underwater mortgages in the past few years and they have not been too successful. One big question is will the banks and servicers go along with the plan if it were to get through Congress.

In addition, the loans will be backed into FHA loans. But, FHA is on very shaky ground right now and is in no better shape financially than Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Some experts even think that FHA may need a bailout in the near future.

The last thing this Congress wants to do right now is to pass yet another stimulus bill, so many pundits see the proposal as “Dead on Arrival.”

In conclusion, an assortment of programs have been introduced to help struggling homeowners, and they have only had limited success. In order for this plan to get off the ground, it will need to be a joint effort by the White House, the lender, the servicer and the consumer… a feat that is always difficult to achieve when there are many moving targets and several different agencies involved.

Economic Calendar for the Week of February 06 – February 10

Date
ET
Economic Report
For
Estimate
Actual
Prior
Impact
Thu. February 09
08:30
Jobless Claims (Initial)
2/04
370K
 
367K
Moderate
Fri. February 10
10:00
Consumer Sentiment Index (UoM)
Feb
74.0
 
75.0
Moderate

 

   

 

 
 
The material contained in this newsletter has been prepared by an independent third-party provider. The content is provided for use by real estate, financial services and other professionals only and is not intended for consumer distribution. The material provided is for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment and/or mortgage advice. Although the material is deemed to be accurate and reliable, there is no guarantee it is without errors.
As your mortgage professional, I am sending you the MMG WEEKLY because I am committed to keeping you updated on the economic events that impact interest rates and how they may affect you.
Mortgage Market Guide, LLC is the copyright owner or licensee of the content and/or information in this email, unless otherwise indicated.   Mortgage Market Guide, LLC does not grant to you a license to any content, features or materials in this email.   You may not distribute, download, or save a copy of any of the content or screens except as otherwise provided in our Terms and Conditions of Membership, for any purpose.

Certified Mortgage Planner, Curtis Schartz, Home loan, Interest Rate, Interest Rates, kansas city, lees summit, lower interest, lower rates, Mortgage, mortgage backed securities, no cost refinance, overland park, Pulaski Bank, purchase, rate, Rates, Refinance, shawnee